R.M. Williams Outback

ONLINE OFFERS...

Christmas PackChristmas Pack »
OUTBACK has bundled up five great gifts worth a massive $172.80, for just $89.95. You will get a stunning 2015 OUTBACK Calendar ($19.95), a hardcover 2015 OUTBACK Diary ($24.95), an R.M.Williams saltwater crocodile key ring ($44.95), R.M.Williams chocolate dryskin cap ($29.95) and a one-year subscription. Yes, that's all five items for $89.95! Merchandise available from October.
Click here to order.

2015 OUTBACK Calendar2015 OUTBACK Calendar »

The 2015 OUTBACK Calendar offers a smorgasbord of vibrant images showcasing regional and remote Australia. Order yours now for only $19.95 to avoid missing out (available early October).To view images click here


2015 OUTBACK Diary2015 OUTBACK Diary »
Our 2015 OUTBACK Diary is terrific value. You get a beautifully illustrated hardcover diary, plus a $44.95 R.M.Williams saltwater crocodile strap key ring – all for just $24.95 (available early October). To view images click here

Hoofs & Horns - The Best of the 1950s and TodayHoofs & Horns - The Best of the 1950s and Today »
Following the successful relaunch last year of R.M.Williams Hoofs and Horns, we have produced a second edition, Hoofs & Horns - The Best of the 1950s and Today. Anyone who loves Australian horse sports will appreciate our Hoofs & Horns magazines.
Available from late October.

2015 Hoofs & Horns Calendar2015 Hoofs & Horns Calendar »

Enjoy a mixture of heritage 1950s Hoofs and Horns magazine imagery and action-packed contemporary photos in the 2015 Hoofs and Horns Calendar for just $18.95 (available early October). To view images click here

IN THIS ISSUE...

The way ahead for woolThe way ahead for wool »
With the size of the nation’s sheep flock and returns for many wool types at historic lows, wild dogs prowling the countryside, complex market forces at play and drought thrown in for good measure, one could be forgiven for thinking that Australia’s wool industry is in the doldrums. Indeed, many producers (especially those at the fine and superfine end) are questioning wool’s...

Weird and wonderfulWeird and wonderful »
If you’ve ever sunk your teeth into an Australian-grown wax jambu, then it’s odds-on that you’ve eaten fruit grown by the Salleras family. Perched high on a rainforest-clad hill in the wettest part of the continent, Fruit Forest Farm is a lifelong labour of love for Peter and Alison Salleras. More varieties of tropical fruit are probably produced on this 87-hectare Tully farm...

Nature\'s potluckNature's potluck »
Chef Kirby Shearing's regular foraging trips take him on a loop around South Australia’s Limestone Coast, scouring inland streams and springs for juicy watercress before heading south to harvest saltbush, samphire, pigface and native spinach from coastal dunes. When the tide is out, shallow reefs are awash with sea grapes, while native parsley and nasturtiums are often found in more urban...

Wild winter walkWild winter walk »
In the wild Central Highlands of Tasmania, in a land of frozen tarns, dolerite tors arranged like castles and 1600-year-old pencil pines so bowed by the cold that they grow no more than 1 centimetre a year, an ancient track weaves through green and golden moors of button grass, over snow-laden passes and around tiny alpine gardens fit for fairies. It’s a land of breathtaking beauty, from...

Breaking fresh groundBreaking fresh ground »
This striking vehicle sits on an Alfa Romeo platform and carries an innovative nine-speed transmission plus a clever axle-disconnect system, which cuts drive to the back wheels when it isn’t needed. Then there’s the style, a radical departure from the square-jawed approach of some previous Jeep Cherokees. The Australian offerings begin with the two-wheel-drive Sport, with 2.4-litre...

Rebekah\'s arkRebekah's ark »
The Pied Piper of Pittsworth strides across the manicured ridge, past Feathers the peafowl chick of unknown gender, across to the pens behind the cream shed. Here wait half a dozen dogs. There are the border collies Mia and young Heidi, plus a pair of Japanese spitz, Meesha and Lilly. In the next pen sit a patient Kirra, another black and white collie, plus Sammy, the third of the...

Harbouring the AnzacsHarbouring the Anzacs »
It was just after dawn on November 1, 1914, when a huge, mixed fleet began lining up to leave King George Sound and Princess Royal Harbour, which comprise the magnificent stretch of water, 14 kilometres by 12 kilometres, that is the Western Australian port of Albany. Albany was the departure point for troops leaving to fight on the battlefields of Europe in World War I. They comprised the...

A year in the outbackA year in the outback »
Port Lincoln photographer Robert Lang was cold, muddy and tired by the time he got the shot that became the cover of the 2015 R.M.Williams OUTBACK Calendar. “I pushed the usual 30-second night exposure to a full four minutes to get the mood in the clouds and bring out the night sky,” he says. “Then I painted the dead tree and the background with a high-powered torch. The...

Less stressLess stress »
Jim Lindsay straddles the rails of a stockyard in northern Australia and, with microphone slung around his neck, explains the benefits of moving cattle using Low Stress Stock-handling (LSS). To his left, Grahame Rees and Rod Knight stand in the scant shade of a desert tree and discuss an innovative way to market the same animals. Together, the three men are changing traditional thinking on these...

Barkly flavourBarkly flavour »
In the quiet of dawn, first-year jillaroos Benita Bauer and Belinda Milsom head out along a dirt track to join the day’s muster. Benita has just finished Year 12 on neighbouring Brunchilly outstation, where her Mum, Yvonne, has successfully home-tutored her and her younger sister all the way through school. Belinda, who’s also the home tutor on Helen Springs, is fresh from two years...

Application of ingenuityApplication of ingenuity »
Grain grower Mic Fels just can’t help himself. When something isn’t quite meeting the needs of his farm, about 50 kilometres north-east of Esperance in southern Western Australia, he determinedly channels all his energy, intellect and inventiveness into creating a solution. Mic’s father was among the first to farm the Esperance sandplain, taking up land in the late 1950s...
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